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Welcome! – Our Top Ten List

The University Libraries extend a warm welcome to new and returning UB students and faculty. We look forward to working with you!

The Libraries facilitate access to information in many formats, including print and digital collections, maps, music scores, CDs, DVDs and more.

The start of a new semester is the perfect time to share our Top Ten List of “must-knows” about the Libraries.

Ten Things Everyone Should Know About the UB Libraries:

10. Our Libraries have extended hours.
9. Each major has a subject librarian who can help you with your information needs.
8. You can get instant answers from knowledgeable professionals on 24/7 chat.
7. The Libraries have an online guide that explains basic research skills.
6. There are many different group and silent study spaces in the Libraries – choose your favorite.
5. You can use your print quota from your laptop.
4. Lockwood Library is open 24/7 during Fall and Spring semesters.
3. Have journal articles and book chapters delivered electronically, and library books made available for pick-up at the UB library of your choice using Delivery+
2. Undergraduate students are required to complete the Library Skills Workbook during their first year at UB.
1. The UB Libraries are the go-to places to find sources for your research paper or project.

“The Work of a Country Doctor” Digital Collection

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The Work of a Country Doctor: Digitized Notebooks, Photographs, and Ephemera of Doctor Homer T. Jackson, M.D.The Work of a Country Doctor: Digitized Notebooks, Photographs and Ephemera of Doctor Homer T. Jackson, M.D. offers a fascinating glimpse into the practice of rural medicine a century ago.

Homer T. Jackson, M.D. (1846-1926), a graduate of UB Medical School, Class of 1881, practiced medicine for many years in the village of Verona, NY during the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Dr. Jackson’s handwritten medical treatments and procedures, pharmacologic formularies, medical school class notes, and his notes and reactions to the professional literature of the day have been digitized and added to the UB Libraries’ Digital Collections.

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Silver Creek Shakespeare Club

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Silver Creek Shakespeare Club Photograph, circa 1890

Silver Creek Shakespeare Club Photograph, circa 1890

by Joseph Patton, MLS ’15

The Silver Creek Shakespeare Club was founded in 1889 by Rev. Robert Newton Stubbs in Silver Creek, New York.  The club was founded to, as Rev. Stubbs expressed, “…give what pleasure we can get what benefit we may.”  Becoming a club exclusively for women after 1895, membership was limited to twenty five individuals with specific ballot casting to determine votes.  Members were required to consider all applications to the club.

The club focused on interpretive readings of the texts of William Shakespeare, as well as other figures and elements of English literature.  They generally focused on three to four plays during the year and had about twenty different meetings where discussions took place.  During the meetings there would often be food and entertainment to accompany readings of characters and history within each work.  Additionally, the club would observe specific holidays such as Twelfth Night (the first meeting of January), Shakespeare’s birthday, and the annual picnic that took place around July 4th.

In addition to their meetings and discussions, the club worked to assist other organizations within the community.  Among the groups they aided were the Red Cross, Crippled Children’s Protestant Home, and the Lee Library in Silver Creek.  The club was still active as of the donation of this collection in 1991.

A portion of the collection has recently been digitized by the University Archives and is available online through the University Libraries’ Digital Collection page.

*This post is part of an occasional series written by University Archives graduate assistants and practicum students.  To prepare students for careers in Special Collections, our graduate assistants survey, process, and describe archival collections, digitize items for online use, and provide reference service to patrons.  These posts allow our students to share their experience and impressions of working with primary source material in the Archives.

The YMCA Buffalo Niagara records, pt. 2

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YMCA of Buffalo membership card belonging to Max Cohn, Jr., 1905

YMCA of Buffalo membership card belonging to Max Cohn, Jr., 1905

by Matthew Oliver, DLIS graduate student

Like so many professionals out there, an archivist’s work is never done, and while the YMCA Buffalo Niagara records obtained new and exciting materials, that was only half of the project.  What good is a collection to a researcher if they are unaware of the new materials, added dates, and general rearrangement of records? Thus began my foray into the jungle of the finding aid. The best practice I found was to work in phases, implementing the day’s changes and then print a new paper copy the next day for additional changes. This responsibility was perhaps most crucial to the project, for I was then introduced to ArchivesSpace, the program that Special Collections utilizes to manage and provide access to their finding aids. ArchivesSpace is a relatively new program and not yet widely used by other libraries, archives, or research institutions so I was tasked with editing the EAD finding aid via the Oxygen XML Editor program as well. Perhaps the most difficult task I have yet encountered, XML required editing the raw code of the document. This task acts as a reminder that in this day and age new technologies must be adapted by archival institutions for the purposes of preservation, convenience, and accessibility or risk losing valuable information.

I would be remiss if I did not acknowledge what this opportunity has provided for me. Students anywhere, in any major, can be taught from books and lectures, yet I find the most rewarding experience comes from practical application. This internship has allowed me to do that, immersing myself in the field and actively developing my knowledge and skills. I doubt I will find anything more fulfilling and wholeheartedly enjoyable than seeing and touching the little windows of history that this internship has provided me. While the meeting minutes of the Buffalo YMCA’s Railroad Department Management Committee may sound boring, the page described in my earlier post is most certainly not. It tells a story. It tells of a very real man writing that message, with paper and ink over 100 years old. I touched history, regardless of how noteworthy or insignificant. I saw pictures from the 1920s of Transit Road, then a dirt road sprawling for miles flanked by nothing more than a fence, a few trees, and wide expanse of grass, now a thriving hub of traffic and commerce. Think of the change! History is full of stories, no matter how large or small, plain or extravagant, and to be able to have a hand in preserving those stories is a privilege I am grateful for and encourages me to continue the practice. What of the future, Mr. Ebenezer?  More stories.

*This post is part of an occasional series written by University Archives graduate assistants and practicum students.  To prepare students for careers in Special Collections, our graduate assistants survey, process, and describe archival collections, digitize items for online use, and provide reference service to patrons.  These posts allow our students to share their experience and impressions of working with primary source material in the Archives.

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Stress Relief Days at Lockwood Library (North Campus)

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stress-dogs

UB students can take a break and relax between end-of-semester study sessions during Stress Relief Days on North Campus. We’ll have therapy dogs to meet and pet, free coffee and snacks, and soothing music in the Lockwood Memorial Library.


May 11, 12 & 13:  Lockwood Memorial Library – Staff Lounge, Basement

  • Monday, May 11th, 11 a.m. – 2 p.m.
  • Tuesday, May 12th, 11 a.m. – 2 p.m.
  • Wednesday, May 13th, 11 a.m. – 2 p.m.

 

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