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Why You Should be Searching the Web of Science Databases

Posted on: | by Bridget Schumacher | No Comments

Find out how the Web of Science can work for you! 

On October 14th, a Web of Science trainer will be in the Science & Engineering Information Center in Silverman Library to demonstrate Web of Science databases and answer your questions. The Web of Science indexes over 12,000 journals, 148,000 conference proceedings, and 50,000 editorially selected books across the sciences, social sciences, and humanities.   Students and faculty in all areas of science and engineering will benefit from these sessions, as well as those from the health and social sciences.

Please Note: Registration is required; see below to register.

WHEN:  Tuesday, October 14th

WHAT: Three sessions will teach you tips and tricks for using the Web of Science databases and how to determine citation metrics and impact factors.   You can come to just one, two, or all three sessions.  Your choice!

SESSION 1           11:30am-1pm     Tips for Searching Web of Science (WoS) [refreshments will be served]

SESSION 2           2pm-3pm             Researching Citation Metrics and Impact Factors Using WoS

SESSION 3           3pm-4pm             Searching the New Patent and Data Citations Indexes on WoS

WHERE:  Science & Engineering Information Center, 2nd floor, Silverman Library, Capen Hall [back by the windows]

PRIZES: Prizes, courtesy of Web of Science, will be awarded at each session!

REGISTRATION:  Please register by October 6th by sending an email to Ruth Oberg in the Silverman Library at oberg@buffalo.edu with the following information:

  1. Your name:
  2. Your department:
  3. Your email:
  4. Which session(s) you will attend:

___        SESSION 1:  Tips for Searching Web of Science (WoS)

___        SESSION 2:  Researching Citation Metrics and Impact Factors Using WoS

___        SESSION 3:  Searching the New Patent and Data Citations Indexes on WoS

5.  Any questions or topics you would like discussed at the sessions

 

Be Seen. Be Heard. Be Noticed.

Posted on: | by Molly Poremski | No Comments

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As a student, you may need to prepare a presentation for class with visuals, or a poster for a conference, or need images, video and audio for a digital publication. The University Libraries are committed to supporting your UB educational experience, and are undergoing a pilot project that will provide two computers with a variety of multimedia software, as well as a variety of equipment to create multimedia files. Sign out a camera, or an accessory to make your cell phone a better recording device. Computing time and loanable equipment must be reserved ahead of time.  Details are available on our web page.

The Multimedia Creation Lab is located on the South Campus, in the Health Sciences Library, Room 105 Abbott Hall, and the service is available to all current UB students.

Major of the Month: Check in with your librarian

Posted on: | by Molly Poremski | No Comments

UB Career Services has started to highlight a different major each month, offering special programs and services to students in that department. September is Physics month. In addition to contacting Career Services, you might want to talk with your departmental librarian. For physics, A. Ben Wagner is the subject specialist librarian.

Ben joined the faculty of the University at Buffalo Science and Engineering Information Center in June 2001. Prior to his UB position, Ben had a 26-year career at the Technical Information Center of Occidental Chemical’s Technology Department on Grand Island, NY. He received the SUNY Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Librarianship in 2006.

Ben can guide you to high quality information resources that are specific to physics including the career information sites listed below.

 

 

Whatever information you need, whether it is about a prospective employer and their research, background technical information, or help solving a specific research problem, please contact Ben.

 

Our most significant physics resources are all listed on our Physics subject guide. The three largest databases are Inspec (Physics Abstracts), SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts) with rich materials science coverage, and Web of Science, a highly multidisciplinary source covering patents, journal articles, conference papers, and book chapters. .